The GcMAF Book

Chapter 8

How Your Body Makes GcMAF

An illustrated description of the biochemical transformations involved in the synthesis of GcMAF from Vitamin D Binding protein.

How your body makes the GcMAF that activates macrophages and protects you from cancer and viruses

GcMAF and Nagalase are both proteins, so let me start with a brief—and hopefully painless—primer on proteins. You know those birthday present bows made of clusters of curly ribbons? Under a very powerful microscope, proteins look like that. The ribbons are long chains of hundreds of amino acids that make up a protein molecule. Our DNA is programmed to make tens of thousands of different proteins, and what makes them different is the ordering of the amino acids. Each strand (usually there are three or four of them) of curled ribbon in our birthday bow is one of those chains. The curly ribbons are all attached together where the bow is fastened to the present. They may look like a big blob of randomly-placed bands—and in the ribbon, they are. But in a protein, there is a very specific three-dimensional structure, such that even though the curly ribbons look randomly placed, they are, in fact, very precisely positioned—and even slight positional changes will significantly alter the nature of the protein.

Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is the precursor protein out of which our immune cells make GcMAF. Up close DBP looks kind of like a small Brillo pad, but the convolutions are not sharp-edged; they’re actually quite soft and sticky. DBP contains 458 amino acids, one of which is very special and quite different from all the others. This is a threonine amino acid, the 420th amino acid in its chain. Attached to this threonine is a group of three sugars. The presence of these sugars defines the purpose of the entire DBP protein molecule. To keep things simple, I am going to name the three sugar molecules after candy bars.

Because Vitamin D Binding Protein comes with sugars attached, we can now refer to it as a glycoprotein. Most of the immune system’s “messenger molecules” are glycoproteins.

Now imagine DBP as this large protein with three sugars (or candy bars) attached. The first is a Hershey’s bar, the second is a Milky Way, and the third is a Snickers. All three are attached to one another, as shown in the diagram, in an upside-down “Y”-shaped configuration.

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Vitamin D-Binding Protein (DBP) is the starting point in GcMAF production.

DBP is the protein from which we are going to make GcMAF.

The dashes (–) indicate chemical bonds (pairs of electrons that hold atoms together to form chemicals) that attach the sugars to each other and to the protein.

Making GcMAF from DBP

Now let’s transform our candy bar model of DBP into GcMAF. There are two steps in this process. The first step is to snip off the Milky Way bar. (This is performed by the enzyme beta-galactosidase which is embedded in the outer cell membrane of B-lymphocytes.) You can go ahead and eat it; we won’t need it anymore. If you don’t want it, your body will just recycle it.

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Intermediate in GcMAF production.

The second step is to snip off the Snickers bar. (This is performed by the enzyme sialidase, which is located in the outer membrane of T-lymphocyte cells.) (You can have that one too, if you want to get on the fast track to diabetes.)

Now we’re left with a huge protein that has just the remaining Hershey’s hanging off of it. Guess what: this is GcMAF.

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By snipping off two of the three sugars (first the Milky Way and then the Snickers bar), we have transformed the Vitamin D-Binding Protein into GcMAF.

It’s fully formed and ready to float off, find a macrophage, lock onto its receptor, and then send a powerful message to the entire cell, telling it to stop watching reruns of Desperate Housewives and get to work beating up microbes and killing cancer cells. And, as you know, when GcMAF talks, macros listen.

Candy bar identities revealed

Just for the record (and for you biochemists in the house) my Hershey’s bar is alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), the Milky Way is D-galactose, and the Snickers bar is sialic acid (also known as N-acetylneuraminic acid).

Now that we have synthesized some GcMAF, we’ll see—in Chapter 9 how Nagalase sabotages it…

Copyright © 2010 Timothy J. Smith, M.D.