The GcMAF Book

Preface

GcMAF and Nagalase: two amazing proteins.

In the pages that follow you are going to learn about two amazing proteins: GcMAF (glycoprotein macrophage activating factor) and Nagalase (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase). These two natural bioidentical protein molecules (made by our bodies using our own genetic program) have the potential to prevent a lot of human suffering and save millions of lives.

Research studies have shown how we can use GcMAF and Nagalase to:

  • identify the presence of—and reverse—metastatic cancer
  • cure HIV and other chronic viral infections
  • detect and reverse early cancers long before imaging can identify them
  • determine whether a cancer treatment program is working

Nagalase screening, coupled with early treatment using GcMAF, has the potential to rid the world of the scourge of cancer. This is a strong statement, but anyone who carefully examines the science behind GcMAF, Nagalase, and the molecular biology of macrophage activation will realize it is true.

Many people are going to want to get their hands on some of this stuff. Unfortunately, certified pure bioidentical GcMAF is not yet available.

In writing this book, I have had two primary goals, both of which are attainable. The first is to further the cause of making GcMAF available to all who need it. The second is to promote the establishment of Nagalase cancer screening programs for all adults and all high risk populations. With Nagalase testing we now possess the technology to identify cancer when it is just a handful of cells and then easily reverse it with a few GcMAF injections. For me, the Holy Grail of cancer eradication is finding it early and nipping it in the bud.

Copyright © 2010 Timothy J. Smith, M.D.
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